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The Christmas Tree Library

Confusion over dead flowers

Many, many, many years ago, long before the age of Internet eCommerce, I wired (FTD) flowers to someone.

Back then, the delivery folks didn’t take camera-phone pictures of deliveries. Cells hadn’t been invented yet.

I got a message from the recipient about “dead flowers.”

A couple of iterations of flower delivery later, we figured out that to the speaker, “dead flowers” meant “cut flowers” as opposed to a “potted plant,” where FTD & I thought they had meant wilted.

At weddings, funerals, and other special events where cut flowers are used briefly, they are often bought to hospitals to be given additional life or at least additional use.

What about Christmas trees?

Could they be used again next year and perhaps brought back to life?

Apparently so.

 

 

One of those many great ideas that I would have been proud to have thought of. In the old days, second stores and garage sales were a way to cut down on wasteful production. The modern “sharing economy” was not yet conceivable to anyone. Until an hour ago, Christmas tree reuse was unimaginable to me. Perhaps a more powerful imagination should be on all our holiday wish lists.

And perhaps then we can bring a new spin to the circular economy.

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      Written by Russell Brand

      Entrepreneur in residence at Founder Institute, he has mentored, performed due diligence on and invested in numerous early stage companies. Hundreds of these early stage companies have described Russell’s insights and advice as the most useful thing in the history of their companies. He has always had an inborn ability to find more valuable uses of new ideas and faster ways to achieve results.

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