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    Blawesome Founder & CEO Jennifer Kruidbos on Building for Web3 Wellness Communities (fi.co)

    Jennifer Kruidbos is the Founder & CEO of Blawesome, a Founder Institute Toronto portfolio company providing a platform for wellness creators and their communities to learn, grow, and build culture together. Blawesome is a web3 creator marketplace network, with tools to help wellness creators to grow, manage and monetize their communities, including practice management structures and tokenized communities. 

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    9 youth-led innovations that are protecting the planet (www.weforum.org)

    Addressing the climate crisis calls for innovation and collective action from young leaders. This group is at the forefront of the climate fight.

    MAA’VA™ (United States of America) is developing a proprietary sustainable carbon sequestering construction material, turning plastic and non-plastic waste into eco-concrete that can be used for conventional and 3D-printing construction. By optimizing 3D-printing technology, MAA’VA can build environmentally friendly low-cost housing with eco-concrete in one day for 1/10th of the construction cost and half of the construction waste.

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    The Rocket Motor of the Future Breathes Air Like a Jet Engine (www.wired.com)

    When Davis founded Mountain Aerospace Research Solutions in 2018, no one had ever made a working air-breathing rocket engine before. NASA and aerospace giants like Rolls-Royce had tried, and all the projects fizzled out due to soaring costs and major technological challenges. But Davis, a former Aviation Ordnance technician in the Marines, had an idea for an air-breathing engine of his own and couldn’t shake the idea.

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    3D Printable "Eco-concrete" Lends Affordability to Housing (www.thomasnet.com)

    MAA’VA will cut traditional construction time, costs, and waste by more than 60%.

    Marieh Mehran, an Iranian-born architect who first came to the United States to study at UCLA, was first struck by the homelessness she saw in the Los Angeles area despite the wealth and resources that exist here in the U.S. The idea that homelessness was such a global problem drove Mehran to use her skills to work toward developing a solution that could create better access to cheaper, more sustainable building materials.